Cell Phone Use and the Risk of Brain Cancer

The use of cell phones has taken the world by storm. From the old to the very young is using cell phones. Many households are without a home phone entirely because the cellular has taken its place. People use cell phones so much that the device has taken on a life of its own. Television networks, movie studios, music industry, and giant internet companies have all capitalized on the cellular telephone to further their objectives.

A few years ago, a multitude of mobile program developers were hired by many companies to build the next generation of mobile phones that would interact with the internet. We are now seeing this come to pass with the high level of performance of today’s wireless mobile units. We can say then that the cell phone is here to stay or is it?

Most would argue that the mobile phone is here to stay but at what cost to our health. Yes, the cellular phone is convenient; that is why we use it. We use the cellular telephone so much that it is causing motor vehicle accidents left and right. That is one of the ways it is affecting our health, negatively of course. Anyone can attest to seeing someone driving while blabbing on the phone; most of the times these drivers are so involved with their conversations that they don’t even know what’s going on around them, in regards to the road and traffic.

It is not rare to see a near-miss and a cell phone talker being at the helm of one of the vehicles. A rule of thumb is to always lookout for drivers on their phones. Make sure the horn works on the vehicle being driven because it may be needed at moment’s notice. Accidents are common among people who talk on their phones and drive at the same time, but is this the only threat cell phone use pose on human health? No! Not according to a National Cancer Institute’s (NCI) study.

Some in the scientific community say cell phone use pose a great risk to human health because it emits radiation in the form of radiofrequency (RF) energy, which has the potential of causing cancer. In fact, no one knows for sure how much radiation is completely safe for the human body. The wireless spectrum is a fairly new technology, so radiation from cellular telephone’s effect on the human body has not yet been extensively studied, (NCI). There simply hasn’t been enough time to see long-term effects of cell phone use-not enough data available.

Why is all the fuss about cell phone use and brain cancer? Well, the answers are here. According to the NCI, cellular telephones emit radiofrequency (RF) energy, which is another name used for radio waves. Exposure to high levels of RF energy causes heating of body tissues, ever wondered why your cell phone becomes hot against the ear when talking for an extended period, enough said! According to the NCI study, the RF energy produced from cellular telephones is too low to cause significant tissue heating and tissue damage.

Studies are currently being conducted of tumors of the brain and central nervous system and other site of the head and neck because the side of the head is where people place their cell phones when speaking. Cell phones are held next to the head when being used. At the moment though, studies have not shown any consistent link between cellular telephone use and cancer. Additional research is needed before firm confirmation can be made, (NCI).

A cellular telephone user is exposed to RF energy through the phone’s antenna. The fact that the antenna of a hand-held cellular telephone is in the handset, it will most likely affect the brain and subsequently the nervous system because it is held against the head. So, the closer the antenna is to the head, the greater the danger of RF exposure. Therefore, a person will absorb less RF energy when the cellular unit’s antenna is at a significant distance away from the user, (NCI).

An important point is that the amount of RF energy increases the farther away the communication tower or base is from the cell phone and its user. In other words, the cellular telephone has to increase its RF energy output when the main tower is far away; thus, introducing a higher degree of radiofrequency radiation to the user. So, the closer the tower to the cellular phone, the less energy is generated by the phone, and therefore, the less radiation the cell phone user will be exposed to. This raises an important question. How can a person avoid dealing with cell phone towers that are too far apart?

One should not be a penny wise and a pound foolish. In general, the cheaper the cell phone plans and services of a new and less establish cell phone company are the lower the overall quality of the service is going to be, in regards to drop calls and such. This means that the towers are going to be farther apart. When the towers are farther apart, the amount of RF energy that will be required to maintain a connection will be tremendously high. All this high degree of radiation will be transmitted directly into the user’s body, especially if the wireless device is held close to the body, such as the head.

It cost wireless phone companies millions of dollars to put up communication towers. So, if a company is going to always offer half price of the going rates of cell phone services, this company will not have the revenue to build many communication towers; thus, the towers that such companies will have will be dramatically less than that of companies with traditionally high levels of cellular telephone services and whom have been around for a long time.

A person will therefore be exposed to more RF radiation with phones from less well-known companies rather than phones with more well known companies because less well-known companies will not have the capital to build many towers as does the more establish and major companies. Yes, the company may be able to offer great cell phone plans and deals; however, the rate of radiation exposure will be much higher. One doesn’t need to be a rocket scientist to see the idea! Therefore, the more popular a less well-known cellular telephone company becomes, the more communication towers it will have and the higher its cellular phone plans will become!

There are more factors that determine how much RF energy a cellular telephone user experiences. Some of these are: number of calls; duration of calls; amount of cellular phone traffic; the size of the cell phone unit itself; and the extended distance of the unit’s antenna, (NCI). In fact, many people speak on the cell phone for very long periods and this definitely is not a good practice. It is best to keep cell phone calls to a minimum. A cell phone should only be used sparingly.

How about the long term effect of cellular telephone use on children and teens? Researchers at the NCI conducted a study to see if children would be more at risk for brain cancers by using cell phones. Persons 18 years and older were used in the study. The study found that there were no possible risks among children who used cell phones. In fact, very few children used cell phone prior to the date of the study. Therefore, there are no data concerning possible risk. Nevertheless, there was concern that certain agents such as ionizing radiation and other chemicals pose great risks in children because they can affect the developing brain and nervous system. However, the study found that the radiation emitted by cell phones has not been demonstrated to cause brain cancers in humans of any age at this present time. More studies are still needed to fully rule out the possibility of cell phone induced cancers.

The bottom line is that wireless phones should be used sparingly because no one knows for sure if they cause cancers in humans. A rule of thumb is to always use a head set or put the cell phone on speaker when speaking, and keep it away from the body at all times when it is turned on. It is always better to be safe than sorry!

The cellular telephone is a great tool for communication. However, it poses great risks to our health-accidents and brain cancers. Accidents have increased dramatically as a result of people talking on their cellular phones and driving. Although, there is no solid evidence to support the claim that cell phones cause cancers, one should still be cautious when using this mode of communication. After all, cellular telephones do emit radiofrequency (RF) energy, a form of radiation that heats up body tissues, which can be harmful at very high levels. Children could also be at great risks for brain cancers from exposure to the radiation emitted by cell phones because certain radiations do cause cancers of the brain and nervous system in children. However, at the present time, there is no evidence to support that cellular telephones cause cancers in children of any age. One should proceed with caution though because although there isn’t any evidence as yet, there could be some in the future. Therefore, to completely rule out such idea more research is needed. The cellular phone technology is very new at this time; therefore, there isn’t enough data available to conduct a conclusive study! The rule of thumb is to use cell phones with extreme caution by limiting the length of time one spends speaking on them. One should use speaker or a hands free device when speaking on cellular phones to limit the amount of (RF) radiation being introduced to the body.

Practical Tips to Obtain Defendant Driver’s Cell Phone Records In Car Accident Injury Lawsuits

Background: using cell phones while driving is an inherently unsafe: Everyone knows now that it is unsafe to drink and drive, but the effects of cell phone use while driving are perhaps even more devastating, because the use of cell phones while driving is so wide-spread. According to the a National Safety Council fact sheet, drivers using cell phones account for nearly 25 percent of all motor vehicle crashes annually. In fact, research has shown that driving while using a cell phone is comparable to the devastating effects that alcohol causes to the motoring public. See, A Comparison of the Cell Phone Driver and the Drunk Driver, Human Factors, Vol. 48, No. 2, Summer 2006, pp. 381-391. Sadly, 81 percent of driver have admitted to using a cell phone while driving, according to the National Safety Council fact sheet.

In bringing your motions to compel cell phone records, it is important to bring the above-referenced documents to the attention of the judge hearing your motion. It is also crucial to let juries know of these dangers, because it will affect how the jury views the defendant’s conduct, even in cases where the defense admits to liability in a rear-end collision. It is not enough to stipulate to liability and let the defendant escape accountability to the jury for the despicable nature of using a cell phone while driving. If our firm finds out that the defendant was using a cell phone, we will attach a punitive damages cause of action to the complaint, alleging that doing so was despicable conduct within the meaning of Civil Code section 3294. If you have clear facts showing that there was cell phone usage, by all means, include a punitive damages allegation with the original complaint, so that you are not forced to make a motion to amend your complaint to allege punitive damages.

Don’t get timed out: It is important to recognize the key defense that the defendants possess and neutralize that defense immediately: timing. It can often take 6 months or more to get cell phone records from the time that you first notice the deposition duces tecum until you have the records in your hands. In most aspects of a personal injury case, the defense will try to stall and delay the case until it is time for trial, and discovery has closed, leaving the plaintiff with holes in her case. That is particularly true with cell phone records. The defendant will claim to have forgotten his cell phone number and the name of his cell phone carrier. He will claim to have lost his cell phone records. The cell phone carrier will throw up road blocks, too. In most cases, the judge won’t let you get the cell phone records from the carrier until you have demonstrated due diligence in getting the records from the defendant himself.

As you will see in this article and the associated subsequent articles, there is a long process for seeking these documents through written depositions, written discovery, meet-and-confer letters, amended responses by the defense, followed by more meet-and-confer letters, and ultimately, your motion to compel. If you don’t lay the foundation, or move too quickly, the discovery judge will deny your motion to compel. So be sure to build into your discovery plan ample time to go through the whole process. Compelling cell phone records is like baking a layer cake; you have to build it one layer at a time.

Also, keep in mind that if you want to amend your complaint to allege punitive damages, California Rules of Court, Rule 3.1324, will require you to demonstrate good cause why your motion was not brought earlier. Don’t hand the defense an easy escape due to lack of diligence in bringing the motion to amend the complaint to allege punitive damages pursuant to Civil Code section 3294.

Start your hunt right away: Look for indications of cell phone usage on the part of the defense very early on in the case. Start with the intake with your client. Include a question about cell phone usage on the part of both your client and the defense in your intake questionnaire.

If your client knows that the defendant was using their cell phone, your client will usually tell you, because by now most people are aware that using a cell phone while driving is despicable conduct, particularly if the defendant was not using the phone in a hands-free way. If you client does not mention cell phone usage, be sure to ask your client about cell phone usage in the same way that you would screen for drunk driving, because, as mentioned above, cell phones are the new drunk driving and can change the entire course of the litigation, as we will see. Insurers are willing to waive liability and settle early where their insureds were using their cell phones at the time of the collision in the same way that they do with drunk driving cases.

Sometimes clients will have seen the defendant on their cell phone a few minutes before the incident happened, for example, if they were passing the defendant and were later rear-ended by the defendant, so probe your client’s memory as to the first time that they saw the defendant, and think about if they saw any signs of the defendant using the cell phone.

After speaking with your client, think about other sources of information about the collision. Look at the police report, of course, to see if the reporting officer noted cell phone use. Contact all of the witnesses listed in the report to see if they noticed the defendant using a cell phone. Be sure to ask your clients and the witnesses if they saw the defendant appearing to speak to himself, because even hands-free driving is distracted driving, and the above-cited studies show that a driver’s response time is reduced even with hands-free usage. As if they saw the defendant gesturing while driving, because of course many people will gesture with their hands while on the phone.

Even if your client and the witnesses are unable to state that they saw direct evidence of cell phone usage, such as the defendant holding a cell phone to his ear or talking to no one while driving alone, it is possible to infer cell phone usage where the defendant has no logical story to explain their odd driving behavior. For example, if your client sees the vehicle coming up on them from behind and failing to slow down, your client might not have time to focus their gaze on the driver before impact, but the fact that the driver doesn’t slow down is a flag indicating that the driver was distracted. Weaving is of course another example of distracted driving, as is odd variations in speed. You will need all of these facts to persuade a discovery judge that there are some indicia of distracted driving before the judge will let you compel the defendant’s cell phone records.

File suit early: If you see flags indicated distracted driving, file suit immediately. You will need to begin the process of investigation through formal discovery immediately, because insurers are going to fight this discovery battle tooth and nail, as they are aware that the public is disgusted with distracted driving, and that distracted driving will open up their insured’s personal assets, creating a conflict. Of course, it is exactly this kind of conflict that you want to create for the purpose of leveraging a decent settlement for your client.

If you see flags indicating distracted driving, consider serving a deposition notice on the defendant 20 days after service is effected on them, pursuant to California Code of Civil Procedure section 2025.210(b) which provides in pertinent part as follows:

2025.210(b) The plaintiff may serve a deposition notice without leave of court on any date that is 20 days after the service of the summons on, or appearance by, any defendant. On motion with or without notice, the court, for good cause shown, may grant to a plaintiff leave to serve a deposition notice on an earlier date.

The prevailing wisdom is that you should serve form interrogatories by mail after receiving the defendant’s answer, but it is exactly that kind of supposed “common sense” that you want to avoid in these cases. You want to send the defense a signal that you are different, and they should not expect “the usual” from you in any aspect of this case. It also sends the defense a signal that you are not going to permit them to enjoy their primary defense tactic, that of stall and delay. This practice also gives you access to the defendant before the defense adjuster and defense attorney have had extra time to help the defendant formulate false testimony. In their haste to prepare an answer, the defense might not have time to screen the defendant for cell phone usage, and so the defendant might be unwary of the need to prevaricate about his cell phone usage.

After serving the complaint and summons, fax and mail the defense adjuster to let them know that service has been effected, and let them know that you expect a timely answer to the complaint. Then serve the deposition notice, and again fax and mail the defense with a letter saying that you expect the defendant to appear on the date noticed for the deposition. Make sure that you give yourself enough time to actually get the deposition notice served. Code of Civil Procedure section 2025.270(a) requires 10 days’ notice.

The defense attorney will likely phone you to say that there is a conflict in their schedule, but you should politely and persistently insist on an early deposition for the defendant. When the defense attorney asks what the rush is all about, tell them that it is the plaintiff’s job to move the ball, and that the defense should expect to see this pace continued all throughout the case. Do not, of course, talk about your interest in getting discovery of cell phone usage at this point. The defense will not understand why you are pushing the case so quickly, and it will make them start to question their assumptions about what is “normal” in a case, including their “usual” evaluation of the ultimate case value.

The purloined letter, hidden in plain view: You are going to want to include a duces tecum demand with your deposition notice. In that duces tecum demand, you are going to want to ask for cell phone records. Be sure to bury the request for the cell phone records in the middle of the demand somewhere, well after the usual request for photographs and statements of the plaintiff and witnesses, etc, unless you have alleged punitive damages in your complaint, in which case the cell phone usage will be front and center. Be sure to serve along with the deposition subpoena set of form interrogatories, a standard request for production of documents, a set of specially-prepared interrogatories, if that is needed in your case, and a request for admissions. All of these documents can be served any time that is 10 days after service of the summons on the defendant. See C.C.P. sections 2030.020, 2031.020, and 2033.020, respectively.

It is important to serve a standard set of requests for admissions, along with the deposition notice and the other documents. The requests for admissions should certainly ask the defendant to admit the facts of liability from your client’s perspective, and should ask them to admit the ultimate fact that the defendant is at fault for causing the collision. This is particularly true if the case is a rear-ender, because the defense attorney will oppose the motion to compel cell phone records on the basis of that the cell phones are not relevant in a rear-end collision. When the defendant denies liability in the request for admissions, as they inevitably will, you now have ammunition to show the discovery judge that liability is disputed, and therefore the cell phone records will go to the issue of fault.

Be thorough in deposing the defendant on how the collision happened: If you have spotted one of the flags of distracted driving, typically the defendant will not admit cell phone use. You will need to first lay the foundation for the erratic driving. Be sure to begin the deposition with a benign tone toward the deponent. Don’t clue them into the fact that you are going to press them later in the deposition, because they will become defensive, and they won’t give you the key facts that lay the foundation for the flags of distracted driving.

The defendant will typically admit that they rear-ended your client, if that is the case, but they will gloss over the facts leading up to the impact. You will definitely want to ask them when it was that they noticed that your client was stopped, and what they did to avoid the collision. You can ask them lead-in questions such as “it sounds like you were a bit distracted” or “it sounds like your attention drifted off of the road for a little bit.” Then, ask them if their windows in the car were rolled up or rolled down. Ask them if their radio was playing. Ask them if they had some trouble keeping their vehicle in their lane.

Then ask them if they were using their cell phone at the time of the collision. If they say no, ask them when the last time was that they used their cell phone before the collision. Ask them where they kept their cell phone. Was it attached to their belt? Was it in a purse or brief case? If there were other occupants in the defendants’ vehicle, be sure to set their depositions for a time immediately following the defendant’s deposition, so that the defendant will be clued into the fact that his fabrications might be contradicted by other sworn testimony.

Sample duces tecum demand in commercial driving cases: You can count on the defendant to be evasive in deposition. It is not uncommon for the defendant to say that they don’t remember their cell phone number or the name of their cell phone carrier! If that is the case, you will need to make sure that you have requested collision reports and bills of lading applicable to the shipment that the defendant was carrying, in case the driver’s cell phone number is there. Here is some language that would cover those items:

All written collision reports prepared by defendant Donald T. Driver pertaining to the subject collision.

All drivers’ time sheets, log books (regardless of form) involved in recording the subject tractor truck’s usage and mileage by all drivers in the 72 hours prior to the subject collision.

Don’t assume that the defense attorney will object to the collision report prepared by the driver. It might be that the defense attorney will need to use the collision report to refresh the recollection of the driver, and so might give up the collision report, rather than argue that it was an attorney-client communication prepared by the driver for the insurance adjuster to prepare for litigation.

Sample language for special interrogatories seeking the defendants’ cell phone info: If the defendant claims in deposition to have forgotten their cell phone number or the name of their carrier, you will need to serve specially-prepared interrogatories to elicit that information. Here are some sample questions:

State the name of all mobile telephone carriers used by defendant Donald T. Driver on the date of the subject incident which is the subject of this lawsuit.

State the name of any mobile telephone carrier with whom defendant Donald T. Driver had a contract for mobile telephone service on the date of the subject which is the subject of this lawsuit.

State the mobile telephone number(s) of any mobile telephone(s) for which defendant Donald T. Driver had active service on the date of the subject incident.

State the name of the mobile telephone carrier providing service for each of the mobile telephone numbers for which defendant Donald T. Driver had active service on the date of the subject incident.

State the mobile telephone number(s) of any active mobile telephone(s) provided to defendant Donald T. Driver by his employer on the date of the subject incident.

State the name of the mobile telephone carrier providing service for each of the mobile telephone numbers provided to defendant Donald T. Driver by his employer on the date of the subject incident.

Was defendant Donald T. Driver using a mobile telephone for driving directions at the time of the subject collision?

Was defendant Donald T. Driver using a mobile telephone for voice communications at the time of the subject collision?

Was defendant Donald T. Driver using a mobile telephone for text communications at the time of the subject collision?

Was defendant Donald T. Driver using a mobile telephone for any purpose at the time of the subject collision?

When was the last time before the subject collision that defendant Donald T. Driver used a mobile telephone for any purpose?

IDENTIFY the last person that defendant Donald T. Driver spoke with by mobile telephone preceding the subject collision?

As used in these interrogatories, “IDENTIFY” means to provide the name, address, and a telephone number of the person to be identified.

Sample language requesting cell phone records: Below is an example of language that you can use in requesting cell phone records. Be sure to include questions that are both narrowly directed to the time of the collision, as well as questions that are broader, so that the defense won’t say that they don’t have records which are precisely that exact. Bear in mind that the defendant will typically say that they are not in the possession, custody, and control of the requested records. Your primary purpose in requesting these records is to demonstrate to the discovery judge that it will be necessary to compel the defendant to sign a release of records, because the defendant will, by that time, have answered these questions saying that they don’t have possession of the records. In most cases, the only custodian of the records will be the carriers, but you have to set up the defendant by asking these questions first.

Produce all contracts for the delivery of mobile telephony service entered into between defendant Donald T. Driver and any mobile telephony carrier which was in effect at the time of the subject collision.

Produce all contracts for the delivery of mobile telephony service entered into between defendant Donald T. Driver’s employer and any mobile telephony carrier which provided service for defendant Donald T. Driver’s use in effect at the time of the subject collision.

Produce any and all billing statements in the possession, custody or control of the responding defendants for mobile telephony service used by defendant Donald T. Driver for mobile telephony service which was in effect for the billing period which covered the date of service for May 1, 2008 [insert the date of your subject collision].

Produce any and all billing statements covering the period of 10:00 a.m. through 2:00 p.m. on the day of the subject collision for mobile telephony service used by defendant Donald T. Driver.

You are going to have to customize the language above to fit your case. If the collision happened at 12:00 noon, for example, you will want to go back to 10:00 a.m. and forward to 2:00 p.m. to make sure that you get the data for the subject call, in case the parties or the reporting police officer got the time of the collision a bit off.

Conclusion: It may be a long haul to get cell phone records in car accident litigation, start now: You can count on both the defendant and the defense attorney to fight tooth and nail to prevent you from getting your hands on the requested cell phone records. Start your hunt early, or you will find that you are right up against the discovery cut-off without your records, or without adequate time to amend your complaint to allege punitive damages.

The Cell Phone Mysteries – What Are Dual, Tri and Quad Band Cell Phones and Where Will They Work?

The world of the mobile phone is a confusing one these days, particularly for those wondering how to start a cell phone business. Few things are perhaps as confusing as GSM frequencies and GSM phones that seem to work in some parts of the world but not in others.

Multiple band cell phones and GSM frequencies can be especially confusing for anyone wondering how to start a cell phone business.

So what is the background behind the GSM network?

The GSM network was first suggested by a group of European technicians and policy makers in 1982 and it didn’t take long for consumers and phone makers to adopt the new network after it first emerged in 1991. It wasn’t long before there was growing GSM coverage in an increasing number of countries.

The GSM world grew quickly. There were more than one million subscribers spread over 70 carriers in 30 countries by the end of 1993.

Not only did the new GSM mobile network send and receive all of its information digitally, making it the first 2G mobile phone to be developed it also gave users a great deal of freedom on what they did with it. For the first time they were able to send short written messages to each other for a fraction of the price of a phone call, they could change their carrier and/or go to a different country without getting a new phone.

All they needed to do was to take one GSM SIM card out and replace it with another GSM card and they were in business.

But, as the unknown powers of the world decree, things shouldn’t be that easy and the GSM frequencies set by most of the GSM networks had already been assigned to other purposes by the powers that be.

So, in a situation very similar to TV watchers and people with surveillance systems, a phone that worked in Sussex England wouldn’t pick up anything in San Antonio in the US. Basically it wasn’t a case of one GSM frequency fits all.

As a result, many cell phone makers create cell phones that can work with more than one band with some working with as many as 4 bands.

Still this doesn’t mean there aren’t questions and people are often left asking:

  • What is GSM?
  • What are the GSM frequencies?
  • Why do GSM phones have more than one band?
  • Will different frequencies work in different areas?
  • How can I check if a phone will work in a particular area?
  • How are multiple band phones defined and where will they work?

We’re going to attempt to look at those questions in this article.

What is GSM? GSM, Global System for Mobile communications (or the Acronym formally known as Groupe Sp├ęcial Mobile) is a wireless transmission standard used for mobile phones and, recently wireless modems. GSM and CDMA differ because GSM networks use a SIM card to store all the necessary information to send and receive calls where with CDMA phones everything is kept on the phones.

If you are looking at how to start a cell phone business and you don’t have thousands in working capital GSM mobile phones will probably be a better option than CDMA as they won’t be attached to a particular carrier and don’t require you to be licensed to a particular provider to sell unlocked cell phones.

Another reason to select GSM over CDMA is that it will open up the potential customer base for each phone. As unlocked gsm phones can be used with any GSM networks. To date there is no such thing as an unlocked CDMA phone. When it comes to cell phone plans most providers (especially those in the states) love CDMA phones because it locks their consumers to them.

Why do GSM phones have more than one band? GSM Phones come with more than one band so that they will work in more than one country as there is more than one GSM frequency and they are not universally transmitted.

As a result, wholesale cellphone manufacturers make GSM and GPRS phones with multiple cell phone bands so that they can work in multiple countries. Most cell phones work on two, three or even four bands. Quad band phones are the most flexible as they can be used all over the world and are often called international phones as a result.

How are multiple band phones defined and where will they work? Multiple band phones are usually defined by how many GSM frequencies they can operate on and usually come in four different categories, dual band, tri band and quad band. If thinking about how to start a cell phone business it is important to remember the different type of bands as it could mean the difference between your customer getting a high performance phone that they’re happy with and can and them getting a shiny and costly paperweight.

Dual band phone works with two GSM frequencies and, depending on where the phone is made will probably work for the frequencies 900MHz and 1800MHz. These phones are usually less expensive than other types of cell phone and it can be a good way to get a cheap cell phone that will still send SMS MMS and act as a WAP cell phone.

The tri band phone runs on three frequencies and can be used in most countries. This unlocked GSM cell phone is a cheaper option than the quad band phone but safer than a dual band phone.

Quad band phones, or international phones as they are sometimes called, use four bands and can be used anywhere in the world. If you are looking to start a mobile phone business and you wonder what is an unlocked phone guaranteed to sell well and give you the least trouble with customers it will probably be this type of cellphone.

What Are The GSM Frequencies? Almost all of the world works on the frequencies 850Mhz, 900MHz, 1800MHz, 1900Mhz and in some rare circumstances 400MHz although there are some other frequencies in other locations.

Thankfully too areas where each frequencies work is fairly easy to define in the very general sense (although it always pays to check). So when you’re looking for what areas a cellular phone will work in you should be able to follow a rough guide.

So which areas use GSM 900 and 1800 MHZ signals and which areas use the GSM 850Mhz and 1900MHz frequencies can usually be broken into two groups.

If you are traveling in with your cell phone in Oceania, Africa, Europe, Asia (except for Japan and Korea), the Middle East, Brazil and the Baltic region and looking for roaming networks then mobile network coverage will be either 900MHz, 1800MHz or 900MHz and 1800MHz.

If you are looking for a GSM world phone that will work in the US or South America then you’re better sticking with a wireless cell phone that’ll work on the 850Mhz and 1900MHz bands.

Will different frequencies work in different areas? With the majority of the GSM world being broken into two main groups (those that take Most of the GSM world is roughly broken up into four main frequencies 900MHz and/or 1800MHz and 850Mhz and/or 1900MHz most unlocked GSM phones will work on one, two or three of the GSM frequencies around the world giving you some level of international roaming on an unlocked phone.

However, you possibly won’t get any joy if for example you take a dual band phone designed for Europe and Asia and then try to use that bluetooth phone in the US.

How can I check if a phone will work in a particular area? There are two ways to check if a phone will work in a particular area; the first is to get the phone band, which can usually be found on the product description.

If you’re working through how to start a cell phone business and considering phones to stock, it doesn’t matter if you’re thinking about a multimedia mobile, WAP phone or GSM watch phone, the process should be the same. If you are sourcing cell phones from a wholesale supplier or wholesale dropship vendor put the ball into their court. They should have that information on their website or product advertising material for the unlocked cell phone.

Once you’ve got the GSM frequency the GSM phone worked on you can make sure it will work in your area.

If you are looking for a cellphone for yourself this could be as easy as calling your local service provider, or looking it up on sites like GSMworld dot com or worldtimezones dot com.

If you are wondering how to start a cell phone business then your best course of action is to list the frequencies on the description for the GSM cell phone, along with the phone’s other features (like if it is a music phone or it has a good cell phone camera) and tell the person who wants to buy unlocked cell phones from you which parts of the world it will probably work in.

So it looks like cell phone bands and GSM frequencies aren’t that scary after. It’s just a case of knowing where to look and ensuring you’ve got the right phone for the right location.